Crossing Currents: Episode 4

By Contemporary HUM

13.07.2024

Architect, artist and mother Elisapeta Hinemoa Heta speaks to Contemporary HUM about her presentation The Body of Wainuiātea, which is featured alongside work by Latai Taumoepeau in Re-Stor(y)ing Oceania, an exhibition curated by Taloi Havini at TBA21–Academy’s Ocean Space in Venice. She discusses the influence of the Māori pūrākau (mythological tradition) of the atua (deity) Wainuiātea, the need to re-establish a sacred relationship to the ocean and the conversations that guided the creation of the work, including with Havini and Taumoepeau.

Crossing Currents: Episode 3

By Contemporary HUM

06.07.2024

Contemporary HUM interviews artist Caitlin Devoy about BODYOBJECTS, her presentation in the 2024 edition of Personal Structures in Venice. Speaking to HUM in April 2024, Devoy discusses using humour as a feminist strategy to challenge the power relations encoded in gallery spaces, resulting in works that refuse disembodied objectivity in favour of tactility, subjectivity and intuition.

Crossing Currents: Episode 2

By Contemporary HUM

29.06.2024

Contemporary HUM interviews Brett Graham (Ngāti Koroki Kahukura, Tainui) about Wastelands (2024), his work in Stranieri Ovunque – Foreigners Everywhere, the 60th International Art Exhibition of the Venice Biennale. Graham discusses Wastelands as a commentary on extractive attitudes to land, the logistics of exhibiting at the Venice Biennale and what it’s like to be included alongside an intergenerational selection of Māori artists, including his father, Fred Graham.

Crossing Currents: Episode 1

By Contemporary HUM

22.06.2024

Aotearoa New Zealand artist Areez Katki speaks to HUM about The Rhapsode’s Tools Will Build the Rhapsode’s House, his presentation in the 7th edition of Personal Structures. Katki discusses the processes and politics of exhibiting in Personal Structures and the two series he produced for the exhibition, which take migrant and queer positionalities as points from which to restore notions of pedagogy and learning from patriarchal, religious dictates to an affectual, instinctual realm of care.

HUM live from the 2024 Venice Biennale

16.04.2024

From 16–21 April 2024, Contemporary HUM will publish live coverage, exclusive images and videos from the opening week of Stranieri Ovunque – Foreigners Everywhere, The 60th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia. Click through for coverage of the Aotearoa New Zealand artists presenting work in the curated section of the Biennale, as well as in other events held off-site.

Living Things

16.03.2024

In this short piece, originally put together as a HUMcard mailout for Contemporary HUM's Publishers Circle, Aotearoa-based artist Yukari Kaihori reflects on her two-week residency at Ma Umi Residencies on Ishigaki Island, Japan. The impacts of climate change and marine debris on the subtropical island offer the context for a meditation on the ecological entanglements between objects, animals, and places.

We Work Well Together

By Julia Craig

11.02.2024

Presented at Phillida Reid, Claudia Kogachi’s Labour of Love and Nova Paul’s Hawaiki offer frames through which to view the role of collaborative practice in building worlds of love, care, and self-determination.

“To see us on our best day.”

By Dávvet Bruun-Solbaak

15.12.2023

Offering a glimpse at the wide range of emotions and encounters that Aotearoa-based artist Maungarongo Te Kawa and Northern Sámi activist Dávvet Bruun-Solbaak share in their multifaceted experiences at different edges of the globe, this conversation takes Te Kawa’s recent residency and touring exhibition in Norway and Sámi territories as a departure point.

A Film Glossary

By José B. Segebre

29.11.2023

After a conversation with Frankfurt-based, Waipukurau-born artist Juliet Carpenter, José B. Segebre shaped the ideas discussed into this experimental glossary. The entries highlight the ways in which Carpenter’s practice is informed by film and theatre history, and is deeply engaged in the friction of contemporary politics and technologies.

Collective

By Emily Jan

20.11.2023

Upon visiting Treaty 8 territory for the exhibition Collective, by collaborative duo Miranda Bellamy and Amanda Fauteux, Alberta, Canada-based artist and writer Emily Jan considers how these photographic works function as a body which, like the trees they depict, carries stories; of human desires, needs, and actions of destruction or care. 

What is held between bodies

By Clémentine Dubost

31.10.2023

After two years of development with his immediate family and numerous international residencies, Amit Noy premiered A Big Big Room Full of Everybody’s Hope in Paris this September, onstage alongside his mother, father, sister and grandmother. Clémentine Dubost spoke with Noy to explore the complexities of this work and his wider practice.

The Polyphonic Sea

By Emma O'Neill

10.10.2023

Presented at Bundanon Art Museum, deep in the territory of the Dharawal and Dhurga language groups, The Polyphonic Sea features new commissions and recontextualised work by Antonia Barnett McIntosh, Andrew Beck, Ruth Buchanan, The Estate of L. Budd, Sione Faletau, Samuel Holloway and et al., Sarah Hudson, Sonya Lacey, Nova Paul, Sriwhana Spong and Shannon Te Ao.

A River Runs Through It: Creative Currents Through Aotearoa and Japan with Grace Mirams

By Jennifer Pastore

22.09.2023

This summer Grace Mirams spent six weeks visiting studios and sharing her exhibition I’m at the river, I’ll meet you by the sea at Gallery Crossing in Minokamo, Gifu Prefecture, Japan. After speaking with Mirams in Tokyo and visiting the exhibition, writer Jennifer Pastore considers how Mirams’ practice and interests resonate with a region of Japan steeped in craft and exchange.

Dear Ella

By daniel ward

05.09.2023

In a letter to Aotearoa New Zealand artist Ella Sutherland, Berlin-based poet daniel ward reflects on the sensual role of printing technologies and the passage of queer narratives in Sutherland’s practice during her twelve-month residency at Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin.

Feeling, pressed

By Ash Kilmartin

18.08.2023

Zooming-in to personal memory and bodily encounter, Rotterdam-based artist Ash Kilmartin writes on the work of Alexis Hunter (1948–2014) in An Emergency Exit Sealed Shut at Kunstverein, Amsterdam.

Ngā Huarere o Te Moana Nui a Kiwa: Pacific Weathers

By Melody Nixon

01.08.2023

US- and Aotearoa-based writer Melody Nixon responds to digital artworks in Te Moana Nui a Kiwa; a weather station in the World Weather Network project featuring works by over twenty artists from Aotearoa and Oceania. One of twenty-eight stations in the project, the station featured online artworks by Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, Denise Batchelor and Maureen Lander, The Breath of Weather Collective, and a collaboration between Janine Randerson, Ron Bull, Rachel Shearer, Stefan Marks and glaciologist Heather Purdie. Nixon discusses how a selection of these works may reorient our approaches to the climate crisis. 

On Measuring Distance: THE FIELD

By Helen Hughes

12.07.2023

Art historian Helen Hughes examines how THE FIELD—featuring work by Ming Ranginui, Shannon Te Ao and Shiraz Sadikeen, and curated by Tamsen Hopkinson at Gertrude Contemporary in Naarm Melbourne—inhabits the spaces between categories and haunts institutional memories through a unique curatorial approach.

Semantics of a City

By María Inés Plaza Lazo

26.06.2023

In May, publisher María Inés Plaza Lazo visited Ruth Buchanan’s A garden with bridges (spine, stomach, throat, ear), a walk-in sculpture and the result of a multi-part collaboration with the New Patrons that brings the synapses between all elements of Mönchengladbach, Germany, to new impulses.

soft and weak like water

By Amy Weng

13.06.2023

Reporting from a visit to South Korea, curator Amy Weng writes about how works by Yuki Kihara and Mataaho Collective connect the ambitious themes and ideas of the 14th Gwangju Biennale to specific histories from their homes in Aotearoa New Zealand and Moana-nui-a-Kiwa. 

Forever Fresh Talanoa Series 2.3

By Ioana Gordon-Smith, Michel Mulipola, Skawennati, Solomon Enos

07.06.2023

Our third episode in this new talanoa series, produced in collaboration with In*ter*is*land Collective, sees Michel Mulipola, Skawennati and Solomon Enos discuss the importance of shapeshifting, imagination and innovation in Indigenous storytelling, as well as in their respective practices. Written response by Aotearoa writer and curator Ioana Gordon-Smith.

Off Season by Richard Frater

By Henry Babbage

29.05.2023

Off Season by Richard Frater at the Kunstverein München sparked reflections, for writer Henry Babbage, on our asymmetrical relations with the avian life that shares our cities. 

The Octopus Against a Sharp White Background

By Amit Noy

14.05.2023

Writer and choreographer Amit Noy reviews Atamira Dance Company’s performance of Te Wheke in the Lenape territory of New York City, and finds a work enlivened by indelible performances and critical Indigenous inquiry.

“I’m a burnt tongue, crying for the promised river.”

By Anne-Marie Te Whiu

28.04.2023

In a wide-ranging conversation ahead of the release of poet and performer Daley Rangi’s poetry collection Burnt Tongue, Associate Editor for HUM Anne-Marie Te Whiu talks with Rangi about the role of stories, language and community, on the Gadigal lands of Sydney, Australia. 

Thinking Historically in the Present

By Megan Tamati-Quennell

17.04.2023

Having attended the opening week of Sharjah Biennial 15, Megan Tamati-Quennell writes about the work of Aotearoa artists Robyn Kahukiwa and Kahurangiariki Smith, included in this large-scale exhibition in the United Arab Emirates, and how Hoor Al Qasimi has carried the curatorial mantle from Okwui Enwezor to create an exhibition that both celebrates the late curator’s legacy and the diversity, solidarity and strength of non-Western art.

Rocks on Wheels and Flying Shoes

By Rosemary Forde

28.03.2023

Curator Rosemary Forde explores the art-historical and civic context in which artist Mike Hewson’s recent public playground in Naarm Melbourne, Rocks on Wheels, has landed. 

“Sorry … Ummm”: Mystery, Mark Fisher, and Laughter

By Jasmine Gallagher

06.03.2023

Artist Campbell Patterson discusses his recent residencies, delayed by over two years due to the pandemic, at Headlands, Sausalito, and Gasworks, London, with friend and poet Jasmine Gallagher. They share their reflections on institutions of art and medicine, and on carving out their own spaces for the process of creation. 

Reading Artists’ Books with Interjections from a Daphne on Pete’s Front Step

By Hamish Petersen

21.02.2023

HUM’s Senior Editor considers the unique capacities of artist books by exploring three Aotearoa artists’ international projects from recent years. They learn how the intimate encounter between page and reader relies on finely tuned elements to realise some kind of sovereignty over the artist’s story or recognition in their reader. 

To Move Across a Window

By Francisco González Castro

31.01.2023

Texas-based artist and writer Francisco González Castro was first introduced to the many-armed project Beberemos El Vino Nuevo, Juntos! / Let Us Drink the New Wine, Together!, co-created by artist and educator alys longley and featuring no less than 19 Aotearoa contributors, just as the pandemic was escalating internationally. Here, he considers the lessons it presented to audiences in Santiago in the summer of 2022, just as the distance that defined the collaborators’ interactions was once again traversable.

Forever Fresh Talanoa Series 2.2

By Anne-Marie Te Whiu, Grace Iwashita-Taylor, Ioana Gordon-Smith, Lana Lopesi

12.12.2022

Our second episode in this four-part talanoa series, produced in collaboration with In*ter*is*land Collective, sees Anne-Marie Te Whiu, Grace Iwashita-Taylor and Lana Lopesi discuss their recent writing initiatives, each focused on fostering the conditions that allow Indigenous writing to flourish. Written response by Aotearoa writer and curator Ioana Gordon-Smith.

A Place You Didn’t Know That You Didn’t Know About

By Chloe Lane

06.12.2022

Chloe Lane speaks to Aotearoa artist Imogen Taylor on finishing their six-month residency at The International Studio and Curatorial Program (ISCP) in New York City, discussing Taylor's newest body of work, what it's like to be a contemporary artist from Aotearoa in New York City, and what living with a ball python can teach you about fear.