Feminism

Writing

A protest and a mourning ritual

By Michelangelo Corsaro

11.05.2021

In their work for the 13th Gwangju Biennale, the Bad Fiji Gyals call attention to the legacy of Girmitiya women, indentured labourers from the Indian subcontinent recruited by British colonial authorities to work on Fiji’s sugarcane plantations. Associate Curator Michelangelo Corsaro writes about the collaborative work of Aotearoa-based artist Quishile Charan and US-based artist Esha Pillay.

Project

Championing Aotearoa New Zealand women artists

Partnership

Contemporary HUM is excited to launch our partnership with AWARE: Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions. The Paris-based non-profit organisation, founded in 2014, focuses on the creation, indexation and distribution of information on women artists of the 20th century. During our partnership with AWARE we have worked on including more Aotearoa New Zealand women artists in their online profiles. AWARE is a great resource for championing women artists and we’re thrilled to be working with them. A huge thanks to Creative New Zealand for making this partnership possible.

Writing

Ann Shelton’s Strange Flowers Set the Stage

By Katie White

14.04.2021

Inspired by ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement, Ann Shelton's photographs subtly recall both ancient and contemporary female archetypes and the subversive histories of natural medicine - a sharp reminder of our forgotten affinities with nature in the current moment of climate crisis and the ongoing politicisation of female bodies.

Writing

Amidst and Beyond

By Alice Connew, Virginia Woods-Jack

10.03.2021

To celebrate the February 2021 release of Dwelling in the Margins: Art Publishing in Aotearoa, a new publication by GLORIA Books, HUM is pleased to republish this extract in which two photographers speak about their artistic and publishing practices, and about their work highlighting women in photography through collaborative projects and platforms that foster debate, visibility and community. 

Project

Forever Fresh Talanoa Series

Partnership

A collaboration between In*ter*is*land Collective and Contemporary HUM consisting of four edited online talanoa (conversations) between several tagata Moana (Māori and Pasifika people) across the globe which centre around the principles of talanoa; ofa, mafana, malie and faka'apa'apa (love, warmth, humour and respect) and the ability to have a "reciprocal knowledge exchange".

The talanoa within this series will focus on topics such as life in the diaspora, moana futurism, queer identities and ReMoanafication, and all will be individually responded to in written form by Anne-Marie Te Whiu (Te Rarawa), reminding us of our intricate connection and shared ancestry in Te Moananui-a-Kiwa.

Writing

Forever Fresh Talanoa Series

By Afatasi The Artist, Anne-Marie Te Whiu, Momoe i manu ae ala atea’e Tasker

28.02.2021

In this first episode of our new special series of talanoa (online conversations) produced in collaboration with In*ter*is*land Collective, Anne-Marie Te Whiu responds to a discussion between Afatasi the Artist and Momoe i manu ae ala atea’e Tasker on identity and how it's expressed in their creative practices, finding their community in various daily rituals while living in the diaspora, and maintaining their connections to 'home'.

Calendar

Robin White, Another Energy

22 April —
26 September 2021

Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, Japan

Writing

What's for - Decolonial - Dinner?

By Tania Willard

18.12.2019

Co-curated by Lana Lopesi, the exhibition Transits and Returns at Vancouver Art Gallery in Canada presents the work of 21 Indigenous artists from Northern America and the Pacific, and includes Aotearoa artists BC Collective, Louisa Afoa, Ahilapalapa Rands, and Edith Amituanai. In this essay, Indigenous Canadian artist and curator Tania Willard contextualises the work within a wider art history and personal history.

 

Writing

Hotel Jaguar

By David Lillington

11.10.2018

HUM commissioned David Lillington to review Amanda Newall's recent project at Exposed Arts Projects in London, which occupies an old Jaguar car dealership. Newall's site-specific response, called Hotel Jaguar, encompasses an eclectic range of works and collaborations with other artists, on topics ranging from Jaguar and Brexit; Trump and witches; social dreaming and murders. 

Writing

999, Alchemist Trauma Centre / Power Centre

By Jorge De Hoyos

11.07.2018

Berlin-based Jorge de Hoyos first experienced Alexa Wilson's current project 999: Alchemist Trauma Centre / Power Centre when both artists were auditioning for a Masters in Solo Dance Authorship in Berlin. In this part-essay, part-interview, they discuss the work, which is due to be performed in London, Berlin, India and NZ later this year, and exchange their views on feminism and challenging binary perceptions. 

Writing

Feminist Hieroglyphics

By Louise Lever

25.06.2018

A conversation with London-based artist Sriwhana Spong about Spong's practice and in particular her recent video work A hook but no fish, 2017, originally presented at the Pump House Gallery in London, which speculates upon a secret language invented by a mystic 12th century abbess, Hildegard of Bingen.

Writing

The Transcendent and Domestic in Joanna Margaret Paul's Films

By Eleanor Woodhouse

19.04.2018

Artist, poet and filmmaker, Joanna Margaret Paul passed away suddenly in 2003 leaving behind a vast archive of never-before-seen work. London-based writer Eleanor Woodhouse explores Paul’s practice, and considers the significance of her work being shown abroad, most recently the programme of her filmic work touring the UK: Through a Different Lens.

Writing

Nature at its Queerest

By Ulrike Gerhardt

20.05.2017

Ulrike Gerhardt reponds to Berlin-based New Zealand artist Alicia Frankovich's first major solo show in Germany, OUTSIDE BEFORE BEYOND at Kunstverein für die Rheinlande und Westfalen, Düsseldorf. 

Writing

An interview with Jennifer Flay, Director of FIAC

By Pauline Autet

18.03.2017

In this two-part interview, HUM's Editor Pauline Autet speaks with Jennifer Flay, Director of FIAC in Paris. In Part 2 we look back at Flay's departure from New Zealand 36 years ago and her initial years in France, before she became involved with FIAC. We ask how she was introduced to the gallery world, and about operating her own gallery in Paris, from 1991 to 2003.

Writing

An interview with Jennifer Flay, Director of FIAC

By Pauline Autet

30.01.2017

In this two-part interview, HUM's Editor Pauline Autet speaks to New Zealand-born Jennifer Flay, Director of FIAC in Paris. Part 1 looks at the role Flay played in the revival of FIAC since taking the helm 13 years ago and her early ambitions for the fair, through to the prestigious place it occupies in the French capital today.