Migration

Writing

On Louise Stevenson's 'Someplace Else'

By Chris Holdaway

24.08.2021

In Someplace Else, Louise Stevenson chronicles her complex and unfolding relationship with Hungary, travelling back and forth from Aotearoa since her first visit in 1991. In this elaborate, handbound mixed media book, Stevenson traces decades of travel with careful preservation of ephemera, annotating ticket stubs and found photographs with her own drawings and writing. In this piece, poet and bookmaker Chris Holdaway considers the memories that inhere in overlooked items, repurposed carefully by Stevenson as talismans of place and the passage of time.

Calendar

Paul Handley, Pillars of Déplacement

13 April —
15 May 2021

Manningham Art Gallery, Melbourne, Australia

Calendar

Sriwhana Spong: Ida-Ida at Spike Island

06 April —
16 June 2019

Spike Island, Bristol, U.K.

Writing

Forever Fresh Talanoa Series

By Afatasi The Artist, Anne-Marie Te Whiu, Momoe i manu ae ala atea’e Tasker

28.02.2021

In this first episode of our new special series of talanoa (online conversations) produced in collaboration with In*ter*is*land Collective, Anne-Marie Te Whiu responds to a discussion between Afatasi the Artist and Momoe i manu ae ala atea’e Tasker on identity and how it's expressed in their creative practices, finding their community in various daily rituals while living in the diaspora, and maintaining their connections to 'home'.

Writing

Movements of Outsiders

By Alexa Wilson

10.02.2021

Together with three of her contemporaries, interdisciplinary artist Alexa Wilson considers dance and performance art in the time of Covid - how does a medium that relies so much on physical presence, collaboration, audience and space respond to global lockdowns and a forced shift online?

Writing

Looking for Home

By Jungah Lee

13.01.2021

A look at Yona Lee's site-specific work En Route Home at the 2020 Busan Biennale, its references to migration, the concept of 'home', and our new and developing relationships towards stability and roots in the era of globalisation.

Writing

Everything Stops for the Baby

By Chloe Lane, Peter Gouge

23.09.2020

In this correspondence, writer Chloe Lane and artist Peter Gouge discuss the origins of Gouge’s MFA final exhibition at the University of Florida, the functionality of objects, the intersection of parenthood and practice, and the upcoming exhibition at Melanie Roger Gallery in Auckland where the documentation of Gouge's project will be displayed.

Writing

Making Art in the time of COVID-19

By Chloe Lane

28.05.2020

Two US-based New Zealand artists - Amy Howden-Chapman in New York and Emma McIntyre in Los Angeles - share their experience of the Covid-19 lockdown, how it has impacted their practice and everyday life, and discuss the possible ecological outcomes of the lockdown, including the shifting of art practices to the online world.

Writing

Permanent Migration

By Signe Rose

06.02.2020

In a letter to her husband sculptor Martyn Reynolds, artist Signe Rose reflects on their life in Vienna as parents and artists, having moved to Austria from New Zealand in 2010. She also shares about feeling like a constant tourist, and about the ways in which her art is viewed by both European and New Zealand audiences. 

Writing

Always in Transit

By Aaron Lister

18.09.2019

A conversation with Yona Lee about her new site-specific installation, In Transit (Highway) (2019), presented at the 15th Lyon Biennale, her training as a cellist, and the development of this ongoing project. With an introduction from Daria de Beauvais, Senior Curator at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris and Co-Curator of this year's Biennale.

Writing

He Landed in a Place of Absolute Magic

By Hamish Coney, Kevin Ireland

03.04.2018

Although born in Yorkshire, the late artist Michael Illingworth immigrated to Aotearoa at age 20 in the early 1950s, before returning to England and Europe for a brief but formative period in 1959. Hamish Coney interviews the poet and writer Kevin Ireland OBE, one of Illingworth’s oldest New Zealand friends, on their London years (1959-61); a period of, as Ireland explains, 'high-octane education and inspiration'.

Writing

An interview with Bruce Barber

By Contemporary HUM

22.09.2017

As part of Contemporary HUM's series of interviews with New Zealand artists exhibiting during the 57th Venice Biennale, we talk with Bruce Barber about his work Party without Party (2017), included in the exhibition Personal Structures: Open Borders at the Palazzo Bembo.

Writing

An interview with Paul Handley

By Contemporary HUM

22.09.2017

As part of Contemporary HUM's series of interviews with New Zealand artists exhibiting during the 57th Venice Biennale, we talk to Paul Handley about his practice and his work Déplacement (Smuggling Pod) (2017), included in the exhibition Personal Structures: Open Borders at the Palazzo Bambo.

Writing

An interview with Gregory Burke

By Mandy Alves

10.06.2017

Canadian writer Mandy Alves talks with New Zealand curator Gregory Burke about his role as CEO and Executive Director at the Remai Modern Art Gallery of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada.

Writing

Conversations from Jan van Eyck Academy

By Murdoch Stephens, Paoletta Holst, Raewyn Martyn

02.04.2017

A conversation between Aotearoa New Zealand artist Raewyn Martyn, Dutch artist Paoletta Holst, and writer and publisher Murdoch Stephens, during their residencies at the Jan van Eyck Academy in Maastricht, Netherlands, reflecting on the relationship between art, activism and how these processes and practices relate to very real, life-and-death, refugee and immigration policies.

Writing

A New Commonwealth Internationalism

By Aaron Lister, Damian Skinner

01.03.2017

Writer and curator Aaron Lister talks to art historian Damien Skinner about the 'New Commonwealth Internationalism', a moment of post-WWII postcolonial internationalism in the British art scene, and its influence on British and New Zealand art history.

Writing

A Man for all Seasons

By Anna Cahill

16.02.2017

Writer Anna Cahill looks at the life and work of New Zealand painter Douglas MacDiarmid, from his early life in Taihape and Christchurch to his life as an expatriate painter in Paris, where he has been living permanently since 1951.